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On Parenting

Entries for February 2010

28
A good excerpt I found : Read and learn ! * I need to warm up first by writing some email. ** Rebuttal: You can warm up by starting the work slowly, making a list of what you will do, reading over your notes or writing from yesterday. * I’m not in a good mood and I don’t [...]

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28
Mums are always on the lookout for ways to save in these hard times, and that is totally understandable – even admirable. More than looking for ways to make some savings, however, it is also important that we ensure that we are not sacrificing anything in the quality department. Fortunately, there are a [...]

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27
Last night as we watched TV and the third commercial in a row said, "In these hard times," or "In this economy," my husband looked at me and said, "I'm so tired of hearing about the economy." I have to agree.  I'm tired of thinking about it and worrying about it.  I'm tired of people trying to sell me something to give me the illusion of security.  I'm tired of people trying to wring my last pennies out of me, or trying to tell me where I should spend them.  I'm tired of seeing how it has affected many people that I know and love. But at least I understand what's going on.  It makes sense to me, and I can see the broad scope of influence the tough economy has had.  And that isn't necessarily true of kids. Kids, depending on their age, can understand a fair amount of what has happened.  You can use the hard times as life lessons as well, finding the teachable moments in your time with your kids. But kids are really great at living in the moment.  And so, although they can see the big picture, they certainly don't want to hear about it all the time.  And if the grown-ups are getting tired of hearing about it, I guarantee you that the kids in your life have been sick of it for a while. As usual, this is a balancing act.  Make sure your kids know that some sacrifices are being made, but don't harp on them.  For example, if your child asks to see a movie at the theater, you don't need to launch into a speech about the bad economy and the monthly budget.  A simple, "Not today," will do nicely. If your child wants those expensive cookies, cupcakes or doughnuts you usually indulge in at the grocery store, tell them you want to try making your own, then do it!  Chances are, your kids will love getting in the kitchen with you, and you'll save some cash by making them yourself. If you used to go out to eat on Fridays as a family, try making Friday your family picnic day.  Even in bad weather you can spread a blanket on the living room floor and eat delicious sandwiches. The point here is to make new traditions or substitutions that feel fun on their own.  Don't constantly remind your kids, or yourself, of what you would be doing if it "weren't for the economy."  That makes today's fun seem second rate.  As long as you and your kids are having fun, who cares if your family night of Frisbee or Monopoly didn't cost a thing?

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26
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/childhood-obesity/DS00698The brain's memory area is called hippocampus. When there is destructive inflammation in the brain's memory center, memory loss is experienced. Over time, inflammation in the brain can cause significant memory loss. This can accelerate dementia or cause one to have magnified depressed feelings. All of this could play a roll in the onset of Alzheimer's disease. Why is celery an important roll in prevention of memory loss? Celery is one of the highest sources of high-powered flavonoid known as luteolin. The compounds found in luteolin were studied and it is found that it may help to cool off the destructive inflammation in the brain's memory center! New studies show that luteolin silences the nerve signals which travel in the brain to tell the immune cells to release inflammatory chemicals called cytokines. No celery in the frig? Don't panic! Green peppers, chili peppers, spinach, lettuce, chamomile tea and thyme are excellent additions to the daily diet and they will ward off memory loss too. Yes, all these foods have pretty respectable levels of luteolin. Build excellent food habits for your family and children. EAT MORE CELERY! Add it to school lunches, after school snacks and build long term memory health!Original post blogged on b2evolution.

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26
What is the meal policy at your house?

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26
Kids learn by example.  It's a simple fact of life.  When they see you writing thank you notes for gifts, driving defensively, keeping your cool under pressure, or problem solving calmly with your spouse, they learn.  They can see a positive way to deal with the situation in question; and when they see others behaving poorly, they'll think, "I know how to do that better." Unfortunately, no parent is perfect.  You're not going to do everything just right, all the time, and that means that sometimes your kids are going to see a bad example in your behavior.  What can you do?  First and foremost: talk.  If you've realized you've made a mistake, talk to your kids and let them know that you did something wrong.  This turns a bad example into a good one: your child sees you analyze your own behavior and take steps to fix what's wrong. Here are some behaviors to watch out for in yourself or your kids.  If your kids have any of these behaviors, ask yourself where they might have learned them.  And if it's you...take responsibility! Yelling.  If you yell when you get angry, your kids will learn that that's how they can vent frustration.  Occasionally raising your voice when things get hectic isn't horrible, but if this is your go-to discipline technique, beware!  Your house may only get louder as the kids get older.  Cursing.  This one's pretty self explanatory.  If your kids hear you using curse words out of anger or frustration, they will too.  If they hear them used in a comic way, they'll imitate.  Kids will learn, and probably use, curse words eventually from other kids at school or the media.  But if you hear your little one using words that make you blush, check yourself first.  Passing the buck.  It's all your boss's fault.  That co-worker was at it again.  If your client would have gotten you the information you needed on time, you could have finished your report.  Maybe your co-worker really is a pill, but if your child only ever hears you say that it was someone else's fault, they will learn to do the same.  Every now and then, they need to see you square your shoulders, take a breath and say, "I messed up.  What can I do to make it right?"  Cheating.  Do you gloat loudly when you "slide in" that coupon that was past its expiration date?  Do you run every last yellow-turning-red light you come across?  Do you copy the neighbor's garden down to the last petunia because it "looks so nice?"  Do you pick up after your dog every time he does his business, or do you leave it if you think no one's looking?  Do your kids cheat?  If you show them that cheating in little ways is ok, they'll see no reason to pass it up on the important things, either.  

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26
The Olympic Games in Vancouver have been filled with many spectacular stories. Which moment was your favorite?

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26
Canadian figure skater and bronze medalist, Joannie Rochette, along with her trainer, Manon Perron, speak with TODAY’s Meredith Vieira about skating after her mother's death. Visit msnbc.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

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26
A study out of Britain finds that children who are cared for by their grandparents while their parents work are far more likely to be overweight than children whose care is provided by daycare or an unrelated paid babysitter.

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26
What I learned as a camp counselor | Manic Mommies® Media, Inc. Kristin recalls how her motivational and organizational skills as a camp counselor are perfectly put to use as a mom (when she remembers). Great reminders.

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